Measure and Track Glucose and Ketones with Keto-Mojo

 In Blog, Health, Lifestyle

Keto-Mojo, a Wahls Protocol® Seminar Sponsor, has affordable, accurate Bluetooth ketone and glucose meters and kits that will help guide you on your health journey.

The key to success on a ketogenic diet is eating the right proportions of optimal fats, carbohydrates, and proteins.  Macros are your daily caloric intake broken into these categories. They are the literal map for keto success.  It’s important to calculate what those should be based on your own unique age, body measurements, goals, and physical activity.

It’s equally important to learn which specific foods adversely affect you and then to avoid them.  To discover trigger foods that may kick you out of ketosis, conduct 3 ketone and 3 glucose tests all in one day to see if the food you eat during the test adversely affects your ketone and glucose levels, and thus impedes your ability to reach optimal ketosis.

Generally speaking, it’s best to avoid foods that cause your blood glucose levels to increase more than 30mg from your baseline test, and by the 3-hour postprandial mark, you want your glucose numbers back or very close to baseline.  As for ketone levels, you generally don’t want a drop more than 0.5-1 mmol/L, and you do want a return to baseline by the 3-hour mark.

You can only manage what you can measure. By tracking results, you empower yourself to take control of your health.  Sharing these results with your healthcare provider keeps you on track and empowers you to take control of your health. 

This is the healthcare of the future.

Read the transcript of the interview here:

Dr. Wahls:
To begin, I’m letting everyone know that I’m so excited that you’re coming back and we’re continuing to collaborate. I be able to have some monitoring of our dietary success, can be really very, very helpful. Glucose monitoring was the first thing that we figured out and now we’re getting much more knowledgeable about ketone monitoring. And so Dorian, I’m really thrilled that you’re continuing to be a part of the sponsorship family. Let’s have you talk a little bit about the benefits of ketone monitoring. Let’s go with that.

Dorian:
Yeah, absolutely. Thank you so very much for inviting me back. It’s good to be able to support you and the work that you’re doing. Our meter, we actually have two meters now because I know that you actually have an international audience. So I’m kind of like, we have the one that most people are familiar with, the Keto Mojo, the American version. But now we have this, this new version in Europe. I don’t know if you guys can see that, and this is the GKI meter. This is the first meter in the world, that will actually do the, calculate the glucose ketone index that is on there. Our meters have always done both, both glucose and ketones, because I think it’s important to be looking at both of those biomarkers for your health journey. Keto’s kind of-

Dr. Wahls:
Hang on, let’s, since you’ve mentioned glucose ketone index, briefly tell our audience what that is.

Dorian:
So yeah, the GKI role was first put forth by professor Thomas Siegfried of Boston College. Primarily he was using it in the cancer world. It is a relationship all of your glucose measurements in millimoles. Now, in America we measured in milligrams per deciliter, divided by your ketone measurement. With cancer, it’s positive that with the Warburg Effect, that cancer feeds on glucose. Having a nice low glucose and a good high ketones, that index becomes a much easier number to track. It’s really hard to get under one. You’ve got to have glucose at a 4.7 and ketones at a 4.7. That’s really hard. That’s super fasted, maybe eating one meal a day, caloric restriction is going on. From one to three is thought as a deep therapeutic kind of ketones. Three to six is like a high level of nutritional ketosis and then from six to 10, that sort of low level nutritional ketosis and after that, you’re basically not.

Dorian:
But what we have found is I find I like you to do my GKI in morning when I’m fasted and I do find that I find a much stabler number off of my journey when I’m looking at those pieces. So my GKI normally holds between threes and fours, but I’m pretty, I’ve been keto since 2015, so I’m pretty stable. My ketones are 1.1 to 1.7 pretty much daily. My blood glucose hovers between 83 and 77 and occasionally when I’m stressed, I get up into the 90s.

Dr. Wahls:
Well, very good. What tools would a practitioner use to monitor ketones, glucose and the GKI?

Dorian:
Definitely use a meter like ours. Yah. Thank you. But you can, there’s different methods that you can measure your ketones. You can do breathalyzers and you can do blood and you can do urinalysis. There are advantages and challenges to each one of those. The gold standard within the medical community is blood. Blood, doesn’t lie. Urinalysis where we were measuring Acetoacetate, and the problem with that, that is spilled into the urine when you first starting, but then after a while it doesn’t. Acetoacetate actually gets [inaudible 00:04:21] . That’s very subjective, and for the people first starting, yes you can, you could use that, but the GKI is being built upon blood ketones, beta-hydroxybutyrate. That’s what that’s being modeled off. Breathalyzers measure acetone of the breath. The challenge with those is you can have the con-founders from sorbitol, Xylitol and erythritol, alcohol, chewing gum and other pieces that can skew your numbers.

Dorian:
It is noninvasive, which is a pretty good thing in that respect, but you also have to have a breathing technique in which to do it and they don’t have consistency over time and there’s no way to know what know if your meter is what is not working for you because there is no control for those. With a Class-two medical device, which we are, which is a much higher standard than the Class-Ones that you will get with urinalysis and with breath. We have to match back to a control and to a bench test so that you are sure that if you’re adjusting your insulin or anything like that, that you’re getting an accurate meter. Coming back to GKI, I think that we’re going to see far more of this being used in different treatments. Certainly it’s beginning to get more into epilepsy.

Dorian:
We’re certainly seeing some people utilizing it in Type-2 diabetes. I would be very fascinated to see what the results come back from your community as to whether or not that is a valid tool or biomarker for your journey. Remember that it’s, everybody’s different. We talked about the [inaudible 00:05:53] diet and that can be somebody who’s doing the diet because they want to be a bio-hacking, get my brain going. Then we can have somebody who is doing it for Type-2 diabetes. Or somebody who’s doing it for [inaudible 00:06:03] or somebody who’s doing it for multiple sclerosis, they’re going to have a different approach to what they’re trying to achieve. That’s why bio individuality is most important thing in my mind.

Dr. Wahls:
Absolutely, absolutely. Again to the community, I want to stress those urine strips might be tempting to use, but they’re really not something that are useful. I’ve seen too many patients start on urine ketones, very excited that they got into ketosis, then we’re not in ketosis. They kept restricting, restricting, restricting, getting themselves into deeper trouble because they didn’t appreciate that they didn’t switch to a blood ketone monitoring. So absolutely. I completely agree that we don’t fully understand what is the target ketone range that we’d like to achieve for the person with a neuro-immune issue such as MS or are we doing this for a mental health issue such as severe depression or we’re doing this for a glioblastoma, which is a brain cancer. So we’re still learning. But it’s very exciting.

Dorian:
There’s also an important point that your body changes significantly over time from, especially when you’re first starting on a ketogenic diet. In those first 12 weeks, your mitochondria changes and that’s why there’s a journey here, and for some people it can happen really quickly. For other people it can take a very, very long time for all the things to change and your metabolic health to improve.

Dr. Wahls:
Over time, our bodies change because our microbiome changes.

Dorian:
Yeah.

Dr. Wahls:
Our gene expression changes and we have maturing of the individual. That will change in approaches that may be working now. Also your specific goals may change.

Dorian:
Yeah.

Dr. Wahls:
I think it’s important to, and how useful to measure and to reflect on the progress that you’ve made and what are your current and future goals. Now Dorian, another question that I’ve been thinking about is the increased availability of continuous glucose monitoring.

Dorian:
Yes. CGMs I think they are fantastic.

Dr. Wahls:
Do you see continuous ketone monitoring becoming a thing, sometimes?

Dorian:
It was interesting. We were at [inaudible 00:08:49] Health Summit and Dr. Dominic D’Agostino put it up a thing like a RCGKMs coming.

Dr. Wahls:
Yes.

Dorian:
I had a question Mark. In the biotech world, the big guys with lots of money are always tight-lipped about what might come in the future, but there are hints of those sorts of things coming. The challenge that you face is a CGM works on measuring the interstitial glucose, the skin glucose, and that actually infuses into the skin. That’s what you’re measuring and that’s why there’s a time delay of about 20 25 minutes. All CGMs will give you a trajectory of where you are going, not where you actually are at that moment. When you compare, say, a blood meter to a CGM there, there will be differences to them. The challenge would then be having a second compound, ketones in the skin and whether or not, how much validity that actually comes back.

Dorian:
I think this is what we’re going to see as a challenge of moving forward and making sure that this correlates to the bench tests.

This is the hard part. When we do, to get our clinical trials, we have to do 200 patients, low, medium and high ketones. We also have to do it in a pediatric body, not adult body and a geriatric body, at all those time. We have to do lab results, everyone to make sure that they all correlate and there’s consistency and this gets very expensive very, very quickly.

Dr. Wahls:
Yeah, absolutely.

Dorian:
That’s for the big boys.

Dr. Wahls:
Well, I’m looking forward to watching this technology and seeing where it goes.

Dorian:
I think what would it be interesting is we’re going to see some significant changes in this. The technology for that is going to be expensive, but as the technology for blood glucose is very mature, we’re going to see that total cost of ownership come on down. I think there’s going to be a place that you will see in the pantheon for blood, where time and ownership is important. Then, for more chronic, longterm things where the expense does not matter and that will have a place and I think there’s going to be two places for that and for the future.

Dr. Wahls:
It’ll be fun to watch. What’s the most exciting thing that you think is going to be happening next year for your business?

Dorian:
Well, the most exciting thing happened actually two weeks ago. My wife and I have been working for about a year to set up a nonprofit foundation, the [inaudible 00:11:31] Foundation and its goal is to fund clinical trials and studies into the efficacy of a ketogenic therapies for the benefit of humankind. We found out that we got our 501C-3 three status. We are a registered public charity and that to Gemma and I is, it was a goal that had a year ago because we go to see people like you and other clinicians and researchers and nobody’s funding the science.

Dorian:
Yet, as a business person I stand on the shoulders of those scientists. For us, it was important that we had a feedback mechanism that we could do that because we have that 501C-3 status, we have now funded it with it’s first round of funding with over a half a million dollars, which is really super cool. Now, we’re beginning to do a lot of the heavy lifting to really build it up. My ultimate goal is to go to all the different keto food companies, the wine companies and anybody who’s in this space and that is earning an income and saying how about 1% for science? How about if we got all of the community together?

Dr. Wahls:
I love this.

Dorian:
We could have a massive war chest to too to do the clinical trials that is necessary. We’ve got all the tools there.

Dr. Wahls:
Yeah.

Dorian:
That’s the most amazing exciting piece.

Dr. Wahls:
Even if all you’re doing Dorian, is asking scientists like myself, the folks who are really into doing dietary intervention studies to submit proposals for pilot grants because we do that all the time to submit proposals for little 50,000, $100,000 grants to test an idea.

Dorian:
Yeah.

Dr. Wahls:
Because yeah, getting the pilot data that validates my idea, now I can propose a much bigger study to the NIH with a million dollar budget, which there’s no way that that will get funded without a little bit of pilot data. Urge you to do is think about a pilot funding because you can ask us, people like myself to submit two page proposals to review and you could put out call for a ketogenic clinical pilot studies and see what you got.

Dorian:
Very exciting. I think that’s an excellent idea. We’ve got to learn more about how to run a foundation and then the charity and that idea, I’m going to run with that ball, because I think that’s a fantastic one. Thank you.

Dr. Wahls:
You’ll have a much bigger impact by funding the pilot studies. Let us do the grunt work on the pilot studies, validate that this is a good idea. Then go to bigger institutions for larger funding. That’s the way to accelerate, accelerate the change. Well, I love this. This is just tremendous work. I’m proud of the work you’re doing and I’m so thrilled that I can consider you a friend and a collaborative colleague.

Dorian:
Absolutely. Thank you.

Dr. Wahls:
We look forward to seeing you in July.


About Dorian Greenow and Keto-Mojo:

Dorian Greenow

Keto-Mojo founder Dorian Greenow established the world’s first independently owned blood ketone-testing company and is the mojo behind Keto-Mojo.

In 1996, Dorian Greenow left his hometown in southern England for New York City. He had nothing more than a pack on his back and $750 in his pocket. But, once there, he met his future wife and business partner, Gemma, who introduced him to the world of food and wine, and he secured a busboy position at a catering company, which he promptly evolved into a general manager role, overseeing everything from large-scale events for 6,000 to intimate dinners for presidents and princes.

After several formative years mastering the nuances of conducting business in United States, Dorian set his sights on the unknown once again. He bought a motorcycle and rode it from New York to California with no clear job prospects in site. Thousands of miles later, he and Gemma settled in Napa Valley, where Dorian became director of hospitality for the luxury-brand winery, Pine Ridge. Life was good.

But over the years, what Dorian describes as “American disease” set in. His weight ballooned to 207 pounds, he was on antidepressants and found himself able to balance a beer bottle on his extended belly. He’d lost his mojo and decided to get it back through optimal wellness.

Extensive research led Dorian and Gemma to the ketogenic diet. The science made sense.

Within six months, Dorian had measurable success; he came off all his medications, dropped 47 pounds and he was able to deftly slip back into his younger, healthier self. He had his mojo back. Ketogenic living changed Dorian’s life, and he wanted to give back the best way he knew how—by making the lifestyle accessible to everyone.

But paying it forward wasn’t so easy. At $4 per blood ketone-testing strip and the need for multiple tests per day, monitoring ketones was expensive. Additionally, the meters and test strips were produced by a few big players in the biotech industry; limited competition meant prices would remain too high for millions of people who could reap their health benefits. So, Dorian decided to yet again cut his own path by disrupting the industry with his own line of affordable blood ketone-testing products.

He drew up a list of more than 100 manufacturers, cross-matched their technologies to federal regulations, and set out to find a manufacturing partner. After countless doors were shut in his face, he found just the right company and created an FDA-approved meter with a lifetime warranty, higher accuracy than others on the market, and $1 testing strips.

Bypassing traditional sales models, Dorian took his superior offerings direct to online consumers, starting with the passionate keto community, who instantly embraced Keto-Mojo. Within weeks, he was selling more than 10,000 units per month.

Dorian dedicated all of his time to the project, and he and Gemma invested every penny they had toward its success. A month after the fall 2017 launch of Keto-Mojo, the couple lost their home in the Northern California wildfires, but they continued to invest everything they had into the business, leveraging their house, life savings, and insurance payouts.

Today, Dorian has a new grand vision: to bring optimal health to people and the planet through a ketogenic lifestyle. The way he sees it, Keto-Mojo can help manifest healthier humankind by changing the way we shop and eat, and consequently, influence farmers’ growing practices. Thus, his goal is to be a global catalyst for change in the farming paradigm. To facilitate this, Dorian and Gemma have founded The Ketogenic Foundation, which will fund research on the benefits of the ketogenic lifestyle with the intent of influencing health and medical policies for the greater good. A portion of Keto-Mojo’s profits go to supporting The Ketogenic Foundation.

“My goal is not just to sell a meter. It’s to spread keto news, information, tools, and understanding so people can make changes in their lives that will allow them to live longer, healthier lives and stop straining our health and ecosystems.”

Click here to Keto-mojo.com for more information

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